Aleksandr Dugin – Alexander Dugin – O homem que doutrina Putin sobre a guerra total contra o ocidente

Aleksandr Dugin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Aleksandr Gelyevich Dugin (Russian: Александр Гельевич Дугин) (born January 7, 1962 in Moscow) is a politologist and one of the most influential ideologists of Russian expansionism and nationalism, with close ties to the Kremlin and Russian military intelligence. He was the leading organizer of National Bolshevik Party, National Bolshevik Front, and Eurasia Party. His political activities are directed toward restoration of the Russian Empire through partitioning of the former Soviet republics, such as Georgia and Ukraine, and unification with Russian-speaking territories, especially Eastern Ukraine and Crimea [1][2]

Contents

Early life and education

Dugin was born in a family of a high-ranking Soviet military intelligence officer. His mother was a doctor. In 1979 he entered the Moscow Aviation Institute. His father helped him to get a job in the secret KGB archives in the beginning of 1990s.

Early career and political views

Dugin worked as a journalist before becoming involved in politics just before the fall of communism. In 1988 he and his friend Geidar Dzhemal joined the nationalist group Pamyat. He helped to write the political program for the newly refoundeded Communist Party of the Russian Federation under the leadership of Gennady Zyuganov, producing a document that was more nationalist in tone than Marxist.

In his 1997 article “Fascism – Borderless and Red,” Dugin claimed the arrival of a “genuine, true, radically revolutionary and consistent, fascist fascism” in Russia. He believes that

“…by no means the racist and chauvinist aspects of National Socialism that determined the nature of its ideology. The excesses of this ideology in Germany are a matter exclusively of the Germans, …while Russian fascism is a combination of natural national conservatism with a passionate desire for true changes.”

Waffen-SS and especially the scientific sector of this organization, Ahnenerbe,” was “an intellectual oasis in the framework of the National Socialist regime.”, according to him. Dugin also described Reinhard Heydrich, an organizer of the Holocaust a “convinced Eurasianist”.[3]

Dugin soon began publishing his own journal entitled Elementy which initially began by praising Franco-Belgian Jean-François Thiriart, supporter of a Europe “from Dublin to Vladivostok.” Consistently glorifying both Tsarist and Stalinist Russia, Elementy also revealed Dugin’s admiration for René Guénon and Julius Evola, to name but two. Dugin also collaborated with the weekly journal Den (The Day), a bastion of Russian anti-Semitism[citation needed] directed by Alexander Prokhanov.

Dugin was amongst the earliest members of the National Bolshevik Party (NBP) and convinced Eduard Limonov to enter the political arena in 1994. A part of hard-line nationalist NBP members, supported by Dugin split off to form the more right-wing, anti-liberal, anti-left, anti-Kasparov aggressive nationalist organization, National Bolshevik Front. After breaking with Limonov, he became close to Yevgeny Primakov and later Vladimir Putin[citation needed].

 Formation of The Eurasia Movement

Dugin speaking

The Eurasia Party, later Eurasia Movement, was founded by Dugin in 2002 and is said by some observers to enjoy financial and organizational support from Vladimir Putin‘s presidential office. The Eurasia Party claims support by some military circles and by leaders of the Orthodox Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, and Jewish faiths in Russia, and the party hopes to play a key role in attempts to resolve the Chechen problem, with the objective of setting the stage for Dugin’s dream of a Russian strategic alliance with European and Middle Eastern states, primarily Iran. Dugin’s ideas, particularly those on “a TurkicSlavic alliance in the Eurasian sphere” have recently become popular among certain nationalistic circles in Turkey, most notably among alleged members of the Ergenekon network, which is the subject of a high-profile trial (on charges of conspiracy). Dugin also advocates for a Russo-Arab alliance.[4]

In principle, Eurasia and our space, the heartland Russia, remain the staging area of a new anti-bourgeois, anti-American revolution.” …”The new Eurasian empire will be constructed on the fundamental principle of the common enemy: the rejection of Atlanticism, strategic control of the USA, and the refusal to allow liberal values to dominate us. This common civilizational impulse will be the basis of a political and strategic union.

The Basics of Geopolitics (1997)

He has criticized the “Euro-Atlantic” involvement in the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election as a scheme to create a “cordon sanitaire” around Russia, much like the British attempt post-World War I.

Dugin has criticized Putin for the “loss” of Ukraine, and accused his Eurasianism of being “empty.” In 2005 he announced the creation of an anti-Orange youth front to fight similar threats to Russia.

In 2007 Dugin was prohibited entering Ukraine for five years due to his perceived anti-Ukrainian activities.

 Dugin’s works

  • Pop-kultura i znaki vremeni, Amphora (2005)
  • Absoliutnaia rodina, Arktogeia-tsentr (1999)
  • Tampliery proletariata: natsional-bol’shevizm i initsiatsiia, Arktogeia (1997)
  • Osnovy geopolitiki: geopoliticheskoe budushchee Rossii, Arktogeia (1997)
  • Metafizika blagoi vesti: Pravoslavnyi ezoterizm, Arktogeia (1996)
  • Misterii Evrazii, Arktogeia (1996)
  • Konservativnaia revoliutsiia, Arktogeia (1994)
  • Conspirology(Russian)

References

  1. ^ Robert Horvath, Beware the rise of Russia’s new imperialism, The Age, August 21, 2008
  2. ^ His interview at Echo of Moscow (Russian)
  3. ^ Andreas Umland, Will United Russia become a fascist party?, Turkish Daily News, Tuesday, April 15, 2008
  4. ^Russian nationalist advocates Eurasian alliance against the U.S.“, Los Angeles Times (2008-09-04). Retrieved on 14 November 2008. 

External links

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